EconomyInfrastructure

“Landmark Beach Owner Playing Politics,” Umahi slams investors

Nigeria’s Minister of Works, David Umahi, has slammed the 58-years-old Landmark Beach owner, Paul Onwuanibe, for what he considers petty politics.

 

Arbiterz had earlier reported that Umahi had held a stakeholders’ meeting on Wednesday, where he highlighted the government’s intent on the construction of the Lagos-Calabar coastal road.

 

The Minister noted that, contrary to Landmark’s claims, none of its infrastructure was impacted by the coastal development.

 

Umahi clarified that while Landmark may have sublet some areas along its shoreline to individuals, it had never held legal ownership of the shoreline.

 

“The shoreline from the shore, 250 metres by the Supreme Court judgement belongs to the Federal Government,” Umahi stated.

 

While challenging Landmark to provide documentation proving ownership of the shoreline, he said: “I’ve asked him to bring his documents and I challenge him and his co-politicians to bring the documents.”

Read more: Nigerian Lawyer Under Fire for Suggesting Property Rights Gap Contributed to Landmark Demolition

The Minister accused individuals, to whom Landmark illegally leased the FG-owned shoreline, for erecting “caravans and makeshift structures” on the government-owned space.

 

In a bid to explore the global landscape of coastal infrastructure development, Arbiterz staff correspondent embarked on a research to identify countries with notable coastal roads.

 

Below, we have compiled a list of select nations that have successfully implemented this innovative approach to transportation, boosting economic growth and enhancing the quality of life for their citizens.

 

Countries with coastal roads:

  1. United States: Pacific Coast Highway, a portion of State Route 1, California
  2. Australia: Great Ocean Road, B100, southeastern coast of Australia
  3. Italy: Amalfi Coast route, SS 163 Amalfitana
  4. Canada: Cabot Trail, Nova Scotia
  5. Chile: Ruta 1, northern Chile
  6. Pakistan: Makran Coastal Highway
  7. South Africa: Chapman’s Peak Drive
  8. Portugal: Serra Da Arrábida
  9. Croatia: Adriatic Road, also known as the Magistrala

Also read: Innovative Plastic Management and Sustainable Development Goals in Africa

What you should know:

The proposed15 trillion naira coastal road upon completion is expected to but not limited to;

  1. Improve connectivity and accessibility to coastal areas
  2. Enhance national security through better surveillance and patrol capabilities
  3. Increase revenue through tolls and taxes
  4. Create jobs and employment opportunities in construction and maintenance
  5. Improve emergency response and disaster management

Why it matters:

Taking a cue from other countries such as the US, Canada, South Africa, and Portugal with coastal roads, the project has the potential of;

  1. Boosting tourism industry through improved access to beaches and coastal attractions
  2. Increasing trade and commerce through enhanced connectivity to ports and harbours
  3. Creating jobs and economic growth in industries such as fishing, shipping, and logistics
  4. Improving access to natural resources and minerals along the coast
  5. Increasing economic activity and investment in coastal areas
  6. Enhancing competitiveness and economic growth through reduced transportation costs and times
  7. Improving quality of life and standard of living for coastal communities
  8. Increasing government revenue through taxes, tolls, and other sources.

 

The fate of the coastal road project remains uncertain, leaving many to wonder if it will ever reach its full potential.

 

As the clock ticks on, only time will tell if this ambitious endeavour will become a reality or another abandoned government dream.

 

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